Erin Peloquin has written 30 Articles:

Photoshop CC 2014: What’s New?

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Adobe released big summer news for photographers – Photoshop CC 2014. Access your photos from anywhere and have advanced mobile editing tools — plus cool new features for Photoshop. This summer you may change the way you edit your photos.

1 Adobe 2014 CC Release Photoshop CC 2014: Whats New?
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The Photography Plan

The photography plan is open to everyone - no requirements about whether you owned Photoshop in the past. For $9.99 per month, anyone can have access to both Photoshop and Lightroom, plus their corresponding mobile apps. This really is an incredible deal.

 

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE

Changes CC Subscribers Will Notice in Photoshop:

  • Focus Mask – Have you ever wanted to apply an effect just to the background of your image? Or maybe you want to adjust just the subject? The new CC has a built in focus mask to select only what’s in focus in your image. It will create a mask that you can fine-tune if you need to. The selection in the image below took one quick adjustment to the In-Focus Range slider. 3 clicks and I had a layer mask!

select focus Photoshop CC 2014: Whats New?
pin it4 Photoshop CC 2014: Whats New?

  • Font Filter – How many fonts do you have in your list? Tons, right? And it takes forever to scroll down to the one you want. The new font filter will supply the font you’re looking for as you type the letters in its name.
  • Font Preview – Finally! No need to choose a font and apply it to see how it will look in your file. As you hover over each font, you’ll see a preview of your text in the new fonts.

Mobile Photo Editing

  • Lightroom for iPad was released several months ago, and now Lightroom for iPhone is available. Configure it to automatically import all of your mobile photos to to your desktop. Edit your photos just like you would using the basic panel in Lightroom: White Balance, Exposure, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Clarity, Vibrance and Saturation. Rank photos by star and flags on your iPad or iPhone and those ratings plus your edits will sync automatically to your desktop.

lr mobile ipad iphone sync 1400x80011 1 Photoshop CC 2014: Whats New?
pin it4 Photoshop CC 2014: Whats New?

  • Photoshop Mix is an iPad app connected to Adobe Creative Cloud. Open photos that you’ve stored on the cloud, including PSDs. Import individual layers from PSDs. Edit photos from Lightroom mobile. Apply looks and styles, create advanced selections and masks, and apply those cool looks selectively. You can also access other advanced Photoshop features like Content-Aware Fill, Camera Shake Reduction and Upright. Export these edits as layered files to your desktop for further refinement.


If you’re already a CC subscriber, you have some exciting features to explore this summer. And if you’re not a CC now might be the time to consider subscribing now. $9.99 per month is a great price – it’s less than the cost of purchasing Lightroom once a year.

Super-Powerful Lightroom Adjustment Brush Tips to Make Editing Easier

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Our Lightroom Local Adjustment presets are designed to be strong enough to handle most photo editing situations that you can throw at them.

We have local presets in the following Lightroom preset collections:

Odds are, there are some photos that the default settings of our presets will be great on, and others that our local presets will be just too strong for. That’s why saving a low opacity soft brush in Lightroom is so handy. With one click, you can change your brush from one that paints at full force to one that allows you to paint on the effect gradually, building it up from a lower strength to one that’s just right.

Lightroom Adjustment Brush Tips

To save a low opacity brush, activate your Local Adjustment brush in Lightroom (next to the arrow in the screenshot below).

 

panel options1 Super Powerful Lightroom Adjustment Brush Tips to Make Editing Easier
pin it4 Super Powerful Lightroom Adjustment Brush Tips to Make Editing Easier

 

Next, click on the letter B (circled, near the bottom of the screen shot above). Select the settings YOU would like to memorize for Size, Feather and Auto Mask.  Remember, you can make this customizable for your style!

  • For me, the size I program in here doesn’t matter, because I change it frequently by using the keystrokes on my keyboard [ to make it smaller and ] to make it larger.
  • Feathering is usually best for me somewhere between 50 and 75.
  • The Flow slider is key for this tutorial. Flow works like brush opacity in Photoshop. A flow of 16 will apply your effect in an amount equal to about 16%. You can apply additional brush strokes to an area to increase the effect in increments of about 16%. So, two passes with a 16 Flow brush will equal about 30% coverage.

When I activate my A brush, rather than the B brush we’ve just programmed, Flow is set to 100. I use that for areas that need strong edits. And whenever I click on B, my settings change to those that you see in the screenshot above.

Want to change either your A or B settings? Click on the letter and then adjust the sliders. Lightroom will remember your last used settings until the next time you change them.

Those of you who use Lightroom’s adjustment brush frequently probably know that typing the letter O while using it will show a red overlay on your image to indicate where you’ve painted. If you’ve used a low Flow brush, this red will be lighter.

 

It is Time to See This Example In Action

Taking this photo, for example, I used MCP’s Dodge Ball, from the InFusion collection of presets, to lighten his face and eyes. You can see the faint red overlay on his face, where I used a brush with a flow of 16.  On his eyes, however, I used a Flow of 100 and the red is much darker.

 

red overlay example small Super Powerful Lightroom Adjustment Brush Tips to Make Editing Easier
pin it4 Super Powerful Lightroom Adjustment Brush Tips to Make Editing Easier

These settings produced this before and after:

Remember, in order to get the most out of the efficiency that MCP’s presets offer, make sure you know how to get the most out of Lightroom’s tools! Using your A & B brushes will not only be a big time saver, but will also give that much more flexibility to your edits.  Enjoy!

Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter

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You might remember the controversy surrounding this photo. Its beauty and editing potential are so great that we are using it again as an example to illustrate how to use the Lightroom 5 Radial Filter. Thanks again to Dayna Moore for sharing this fabulous image with us!

 

radial filter edit Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter
pin it4 Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter

The Radial Filter is a tool that was introduced with Lightroom 5. This filter allows you to apply local adjustments to your image with an elliptical, or oval, shaped mask.

Since we designed the local adjustments included in our Illuminate Lightroom preset collection with this tool in mind, I’ll use them to add lighting effects to this image. (Of course, you can definitely use the local Illuminate presets with either the Graduated Filter or the  Adjustment Brush tools too.)

 

Taking You Step-by-Step Through In Using the New Radial Filter Tool

Step 1:

To begin, activate the Radial Filter by clicking on it. It’s circled in the image below, just under the histogram.

 

radial filter Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter
pin it4 Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter

Next, you can choose a preset from the Effect drop down menu (under the arrow in the screen shot above). Or, you can adjust the sliders (to expand, click on the triangle above the number 76 above) to create the effect you’d like.

Once you’ve dialed in the settings, adjust the Feather slider near the bottom of the Radial Filter panel. A lower Feather will make the edges of your effect harder and crisper. A larger Feather will make for soft and natural transitions between the effect and its surroundings.

To apply the effect, click and drag with your mouse over the part of the image that you don’t want to change. For instance, in this image, I’ve chosen the Deep Blue Blur from the MCP Light local presets because I want to create a vignette effect around the kids, leaving them as is, but deepening and darkening the sky around them.

 

blue mask radial filter Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter
pin it4 Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter

You can see the circular shape I drew in the image above.The sky within the circle still has it’s natural orange tone, but the sky around the outside of the image is a deeper and darker blue.

Step 2

My next step will be to emphasize the orange tones around the kids. I click the New button at the top of the Radial Filter panel, and then select the Orange effect from the MCP Illuminate presets. Before drawing I click on the Invert Mask box at the bottom of the panel – an inverted mask has the effect inside it rather than outside.

And now I draw a second oval, similar to the first.

 

orange mask Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter
pin it4 Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter

You can see in the screenshot above that I have two pins. Each controls one of the edits I’ve just made. The one with the black dot in the center governs the orange light. The black dot indicates that it’s active for editing.

When  a pin is active for editing, I can make the following changes to the effect:

  • Change any of the effect sliders or select a new preset to fine tune the look
  • Change the size or shape of the oval by clicking and dragging on any of the 4 white boxes on its edge
  • Move the oval by clicking and dragging inside it, but not on the pin itself

And to change the pin that is active for editing, simply click on the one that controls the area you’d like to change.

 

The Results?

With those two quick edits, I’ve created this edit:

 

lightroom radial filter before after Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter
pin it4 Everything You Need to Know About the ALL Powerful Lightroom 5 Radial Filter
 

Keep in mind that you can use this tool with any of the local presets included with our preset collections. For instance, InFusion’s Shade makes a great vignette that is more adjustable than Lightroom’s built in vignette feature.

So give Lightroom’s Radial Filter a try, if you haven’t already!

Batch Editing in Lightroom – Video Tutorial

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Batch editing is one of the best benefits of using Lightroom as a starting point for your photo edits. It’s quick and easy! And once you’ve done all that you can with your photos in Lightroom, you can even open them into Photoshop in a batch for any final edits you’re looking to make.


batch edit lightroom before after Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial
pin it4 Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial

 

You have two options for batch editing in Lightroom.

  1. You can edit a group of photos at the same time
  2. You can edit one photo and retroactively apply the same changes to a group of images.

Note that any of the techniques I describe below work in both the Develop and the Library modules. We think of editing in terms of the features available in Develop, but in the Library module, you could apply keywords in batches, update metadata, or even make simple exposure and white balance adjustments.

 

How to Edit A Group of Photos All At Once

 

Start by selecting the photos that you’d like to edit. You can select contiguous photos by clicking on the first, holding down the shift key on your keyboard, and clicking on the last. To select photos that aren’t next to each other, hold down command or control while clicking on each photo you’d like to edit.

Once the photos are selected, look for the Sync or Auto-Sync button at the bottom right corner of either your Library or your Develop module. We want this button to say Auto-Sync. If it doesn’t, click on the light switch to toggle from Sync to Auto-Sync.

sync auto sync Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial
pin it4 Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial

 

When this button says “Auto-Sync,” any change you make to one image will be applied to all selected images. The Auto-Sync method is for great changing exposure and white balance on images taken in the same lighting conditions.

Retroactively Applying Changes from A Previously Edited Photo

 

Personally, I generally use the Sync method, when I’m applying creative looks to a photo. That’s not to say that you can’t Auto-Sync instead, this is just what works best for my personal workflow. To use this method, I’ll play around with one image until I’m happy with the look. And then, with this photo still selected and active for editing, I’ll add to my selection using command/control or the shift key. By adding other images to the selection, the photo you have already edited is primarily selected, as seen below.  You can see from this image that the photo on the right is “more selected” or has a brighter highlight than the others.  This means that I will sync edits from that photo onto the others.

filmstrip Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial
pin it4 Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial

 

I’ll make sure that Sync is displayed on the button, and then click it. Clicking it opens this window:

 

sync settings600 Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial
pin it4 Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial

Using this window, you tell Lightroom which adjustments from your first photo should be applied to the photos you selected after editing. This method is particularly effective for photos that weren’t all taken in the same white balance or exposure conditions. I can tell Lightroom not to sync WB or exposure settings, but only to sync the tint I added through Split Toning along with Vibrance, Clarity and Sharpening.

Batch Edit with Presets

 

Everything previously mentioned above applies to presets as well. As an example, I’ll edit these 6 photos in one batch. Also, as mentioned above, I typed command/control A to select them.

filmstrip example Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial
pin it4 Batch Editing in Lightroom   Video Tutorial

 

And then I applied these presets:

Taking Photos into Photoshop in Batches

 

If you have photos that need extra work in Photoshop, select them together, as I described above. Right click on one of them and select Edit In, and then select your version of Photoshop. All of the selected photos will open for you to edit. Please note, however, that I don’t recommend doing this with more than 5 or 6 images at a time – it might take a long time with more images and tends to slow down the process.

Video Tutorial – Want To See This in Action?  Click the Video Below To See the Ins and Outs of Editing Photos in Batches Using Lightroom

What You Need to Know About Photoshop Elements 12 Upgrade

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Adobe has just released its latest version of PSE – Photoshop Elements 12.

The most important thing to know about this new release: We have tested all MCP’s actions for Elements, and they work perfectly.  If you use Elements but don’t currently have any actions, check some out!

Our most popular Elements actions are:

Plus, we have free actions for Photoshop Elements as well.

PSE 12 has some useful new features this go round.

My favorites:

  • Content Aware Straightening – Content Aware improves every year in the Photoshop family.  This straightening option is my favorite new feature.  When straitening an image in the past, you had to crop away parts of your image.  PSE 12 uses Content Aware to fill in areas and avoid cropping.  This worked well for me in my testing – if the corners didn’t look normal, I was able to clean them up easily with the crop tool. Here’s an example, courtesy of Adobe.  The first image shows the image with a slanted horizon.  The second shows the areas that would have had to be cropped away in older versions of Elements.  And the final image shows the straightened photo with the corners filled in by Content Aware.
  • Content Aware Moving – Ever wish that you could move a person within a photo?  Now you can.  Use this new tool to select your subject and then drag it where you want it within the image.  Content Aware will fill in the area where the subject was with its best guess for what should be there.  I’ve played with this feature, and it does work on the right photo.  Sometimes you need to try a few times to perfect it.  Here’s another example, courtesy of Adobe.
  • Pet Eye Corrector – Pet lovers, you’ve asked for this.  The traditional red eye removers just don’t work for those glowing yellow pet eyes that appear on our animals when we photograph them with a flash on.

Upgrade Recommendation

Last year’s Photoshop Elements 11 release was huge.  It was a complete redesign of the user interface and included the Actions Panel, which makes installing and running actions very simple.  If you didn’t upgrade to 11, now’s the time to switch to PSE12.

If you have Elements 11 already, this isn’t a must-have upgrade.  It has very useful features, but nothing you can’t live without for another year.

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