Think Outside The Box … USE THE BOX in Your Photography

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Creative photography assignments usually come from “thinking outside the box.”

Not today…  Today we’ll teach you how to photograph “inside the box” and keep things fun and creative at the same time. This has been one of the most widely requested tutorials from our Facebook Group members. So have fun with this and come share your results too!

* Disclaimer – the box concept is shown on Pinterest, and we are not aware of the original creator of the concept. There are several unique ways to do it, if you cannot build your own box, such as using large moving boxes. 

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Creating a “White Box” Composite Photograph

Creating this composite image is done in a series of steps beginning with getting it right in camera, choosing the right lighting, maintaining a consistent look to the image, and compositing in Photoshop.  This blog post will take you through the steps needed to create the final image of separate images of family members in the final composite above, including building the White Box.

 

Getting it Right in Camera and Using the Right Equipment

Creating the composite box series is simple as long as you get it right in camera.  You will use Manual settings so you can select an aperture large enough to ensure everyone in the image stays in focus – usually around F9.  The shutter speed will need to be below your camera’s sync speed – usually 125-200.  One thing to avoid is a high ISO because you want to avoid noise in the image.  I suggest a camera setting of F9, ISO 100, 125-200 shutter speed.  You can try the different settings once you have the box and lighting set up.  Select what works best for you and your setup.

In the image below, you can see the umbrella sits about 12 feet in front of the box, which gives me a good even light and reduces shadows on the back of the box.  I have tried other lighting, including 2 speed lights with soft boxes, but the light was not even enough for me.  You can only see part of the box because I have a small apartment, so space isn’t really an issue.

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My Equipment List

  • Camera with Manual Settings (F9, ISO 100, 125-200 SS depending on camera)
  • 24-70 lens set at 70 mm
  • Tripod
  • 400 watt Studio Strobe with 7 foot shoot-through umbrella on full power
  • Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom – and Photoshop
  • Large White Box (see directions below for building)

Maintaining Consistent Image Capture and Development in LR, ACR, or Photoshop

There are a few things to keep in mind when developing your images in LR, ACR, or Photoshop.  First, and most importantly, you need to maintain white balance.  If your camera is set to Auto White Balance, the camera can change depending on the colors worn by the subjects or the toys or props in the White Box.  Fixing color-casts in Photoshop can be time consuming, so prevention is key here. MCP Bag of Tricks has a wonderful reflect color-cast vanisher that I normally use this for faces to remove color-casts, but it works perfectly to remove color-casts from the White Box. That same Photoshop action set also has a Bleach Pen action that works great with white objects!

Next, the camera should be set on a tripod so every shot is exact.  Double-check that your camera is straight on the tripod and not tilted.  Having a consistent capture in your camera makes the compositing process easier, with less hassle, and quicker to complete.

Lastly, the lens selection is important because you will need a lens wide enough to shoot a 4×4 foot box, but with little cropping in post-production.  I use a 24-70 lens set at 70 mm.

Building the Box

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The White Box is a cube that measures 4 feet wide by 4 feet deep by 4 feet tall.  It was constructed with ¾ inch plywood and screwed together.  The outside of the box, facing the camera is framed with 2” x 2” wood.  The paint is a white matte latex paint.  You may need more than one coat of paint. After a while, the wood can warp so fixing warping in post processing may need to be done.

The White Box sits on a 2 foot high pedestal to lift the White Box up for ease of people when they hang their legs over the edge.  I had a set of wheels put on the bottom of the pedestal for ease of moving it from room to room because it is quite heavy and I have a small apartment. I’ve painted it a few times because of marks made by shoes.

 

Taking the Images

After setting up the box, lighting, and camera on the tripod, I take several shots to double-check my settings.  Then, I begin capturing my subjects in all different poses, faces, and shapes.  After the session, I select the ones I want to use.  Have fun with it – try different poses, faces and make different shapes with arms and legs, the ideas are limitless…shoot RAW!!!

 

Compositing the Images

Begin with opening all of the photos you wish to use in the composite in Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom.  You can use 3, 6, 9, or even 12 in one image! For this instruction I have used 4 images.  All the edits in ACR can be selected at one time and it will sync.  This is helpful if you need to do a contrast/color change because all of the changes can be applied equally to all of your selected images. You don’t want one photo to be darker or lighter the rest. Sometimes because of bright colors of clothing or toys it can cause a color cast inside of the box, you can use MCP Bag of Tricks in Photoshop to remove reflected color casts on faces and the inside of the White Box.

 

Building the Composite

If the box isn’t completely straight use the perspective warp tool… Add guide lines by dragging a line from the ruler on top and on the side of the photo, line up the guide lines where the edge of the box should be then go to EDIT/PERSPECTIVE WARP and follow the steps to add the perspective points and manipulate perspective. I sometimes still need a small edit using the puppet warp to straighten the sides of the box.

 

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When items are outside of the box (arms or legs)  After the edits have been done, make a selection with the pen tool around the box and include legs or arms outside of the box and right click/make selection and feather 5px…press control/command J to make a copy of the selection, then the selection can be moved over to the new composite page. Photos that do not include anything outside the box can be simply cropped to include just the box.

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Make a New Page in Photoshop to Build the Composite.

  • Make a new page, I start out with a 40″ x  40″ 300DPI- sheet just to make sure I have plenty of space to work with.
  • Start dragging each image over to it (add guide lines to keep the images even).  With the page being 40×40 inch and dpi of 300 I don’t have to size the photos down to fit the new composite page.
  • When you have all 4-6-9 or even 12 images on the new sheet adjust the layers so legs are hanging over the next box and not cut off because they are behind it.
  • Line up the images so the frames are overlapping and not just side by side.  For example, if you place one White Box next to another White Box and both have a 2’ frame, you now have too large of a frame – so overlap the outside frame a bit.

Layer on new composite page:

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  • Make the frames for the separation of the boxes
    • Use the shape tool (rectangle) to make a thick line the thickness depends on your personal taste of how you want it to look, with the fill color close to the color of the White Box or whatever color you would like to try. I’ve seen it done in different frame colors for different occasions.
    • Place each line in between the rows of photos.
    • Placing the line in a box where legs are hanging over I turn the line into a mask layer so I can use a soft black brush to paint out the areas arms or legs are hanging over the edge of the box.

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Adding frames to separate boxes.

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And here’s other examples of a family collage.

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This composite is a lot of fun and takes the pressure off the problem of posing families.  The added bonus is that kids love playing in the White Box!

I am an American photographer based (at the moment) in Helsinki, Finland. I love my camera and the time I spend capturing the beauty of life around me. My husband builds government buildings all over the world so we move to a new country every 12-24 months and I have had the pleasure of seeing the different cultures and not only visiting exciting places but living in them as well. 

Photography has been something I could do anywhere and I have a wonderful supportive husband that has gotten used to a camera being attached  to me wherever we go. He has built me fun furniture, made me studios and even moved me to a larger apartment so I had extra room to do what I love. Recently I found a new passion in street photography while living in Finland and have joined a group called “Humans Captured” on facebook where we post photos of everyday people all over the world and include a back story about who they are and what their story is.

My website is Zeemanphotography.com and zeemanphotography on Facebook that I am still adding to. 

 

 

 

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7 Ways to Capture Emotion in Your Photography

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What separates a simple snapshot from a stunning success is the story the image portrays. I believe the most important element to be captured in a photograph is emotion. The more emotional the shot is, the more it appeals to our senses, and the greater the connection we feel to it. If a picture conveys emotion – whether it’s happiness, surprise, sorrow, disgust – it is successful.

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But how do you capture emotion with photography? First, you find a moment and then tell a story. For me, photography is all about capturing authenticity, movement, spontaneity, and mood.

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1. No “cheese”, please.

Emotions, by their very nature, do not follow static rules…..they just happen, based on what a person feels at a given moment of time. They are a complex and fluid aspect of the human condition, but capturing emotion can be especially tricky when people know they are being photographed.

The photos I often find myself most drawn to are the ones in which some emotion other than just happiness was captured. One mistake photographers often make is that they say, “Smiiiiile!”, or “cheese”, or whatever it is they say to force people to give any one constant expression. That is probably the last thing I want. Although, these shots can make for great memories later on, the mood is often masked with a fake smile or sometimes a silly face, maybe even a hand covering the mouth or eyes.

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2. Capture the mood of your subject.

If a child you’re photographing is in a pensive, quiet state, capture that. If the child is bouncing off the walls, capture that. If your child is staring at you, annoyed and displeased, capture that. You don’t always have to place your subjects into a posed position that is traditionally photo worthy – the photos are always waiting to happen, just let them.

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 3. Anticipate a “moment”.

Unplanned shots are awesome. That’s the good stuff! When your subject falls over, looks up at an unexpected moment, or cracks up, make sure to capture it! Those are often the most beautiful, honest, emotional, moments.

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4. Shoot after the “moment”.

Some of my favorite shots of my children are the ones I captured right after the shot that they were expecting. This is when they let go of that breath they were holding in, relax the smile that could have been forced, and the moment when their body falls into a more natural, relaxed state.

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5. Look for and photograph moments in between poses.

We can give our subjects direction all day long, but there’s something wonderful about a natural pose…and sometimes those moments are only to be found in the “in between” moments.

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So always anticipate the next move, before your subject gets there. Keep your camera to your eye and continue to look for the natural beauty.

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6. The “eyes” have it.

The eyes are the window to our soul. If one had to isolate any single body part to openly portray emotions, it’s the eyes. Human or animal, eyes usually always convey what the subject is feeling. The intense focus in the eyes of an eagle or the soft warmth in those of your pet Labrador, or the myriad expressions of a ballet dancer, the eyes are the key to capturing the emotions felt by the subject. A raised eyebrow or a sideways look can sometimes say what a hundred words cannot. I love photographing my children because they are a bundle of emotions, they haven’t yet learned the art of faking, and you can literally see the “truth in their eyes”.

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7. Look for the details.

As photographers, of course we know emotions are conveyed by the eyes and face. That’s the rule. So break it! Emotions can also be conveyed by other features. Never underestimate say, droplets of sweat dripping down a face, the gestures made by hands and feet, or the posture of a spine.

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Don’t limit yourself by believing emotion can only be captured in the face, instead, experiment with a full range of emotional interpretations.

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The authentic and genuine expression of emotion is what reveals person’s soul, capturing that in a photo is what tells their story and should be the goal of every photographer. There is no denying it, emotion is beautiful.

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Julia Altork is a photographer living in Greenville, South Carolina with her husband and three children. You can see more of her work by visiting www.juliaaltork.com.

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4 Ways To Be Taken Seriously As A Young Photographer

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If you’re a young photographer, or know of some younger photographers who have trouble getting taken seriously, here are some tips and tricks to getting the respect you deserve.  

1. Act Professionally

If you want to be taken seriously, you need to be professional. This component is involved in many aspects of the professional photographers life – from telephone calls to social media presence. Often times I will book a shoot with someone through e-mail and speak with them over the phone, but when I meet with them in person for the first time I can still see the initial hesitance in their eyes. I relieve this by continuing to present myself professionally (shaking their hand, keeping eye contact, dressing appropriately, etc.). It is so important for the client to have faith in you as a photographer so I find it crucial to attempt to wash away any doubt. Acting confident can also help to achieve this, so be sure to remind yourself that they booked you based upon your work – they booked you for a reason!

Social media presence is crucial to photographers. It’s important to set up a Facebook page, Instagram and other social networks specifically for your business. Keep your personal accounts separate. Even on your personal social media accounts, never to post anything offensive or immature. Even if you want to be yourself and have privacy, you need to consider everything you post, including comments, from the side of customer or potential client. They may stumble across it – so represent yourself well.

 

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2. Keep Your Brand Clean

On your business sites, such as your Facebook Page, post updates, recent photo shoots, and display your logo. While your brand may evolve, especially when you are young, you will want to make your brand recognizable. Try for consistency–see the black border with orange logo.  I place this on every photo. Also, work hard to maintain a sense of fluidity between your Website, Blog, Instagram, Facebook, and other places where you have a presence. While this can be said for any photographer, not just those of us who are young and starting out, it is even more crucial to gain and maintain respect.

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Continuing with the social media discussion, it is important to approach your photography pages as though you were the viewer, not the administrator. Would you want to see 15 Instagrams a day, and 20 status updates/photo posts? Probably not. This would clutter up your newsfeed and take the excitement out of seeing each post. Try to post when it you have something relevant to share but not so much that you overwhelmed your audience.

 

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3. Stay Organized

Staying organized is extremely important- and is often the hardest skill for younger photographers.  To combat youthful distractions, keep a planner and binder with you at all times. A planner helps keep track of photo shoots, and a binder helps with everything else.

When it comes to planning the hardest part is being honest with yourself. Don’t try to fit a million things into one day. If you do this, you’ll run yourself ragged, and it’s easy to end up running late or having to cancel on someone should one thing go wrong. And that is NOT professional. When too many things are stacked upon each other, the smallest glitch creates an avalanche on the rest of the day. The best advice is to cushion everything - leave extra time for travel and the unpredictable – this way you are prepared should something go wrong.

Keep all photo related materials together in your binder, including extra flyers and business cards, in case I am at a venue where people might be interested in my work. Also, have blank invoices, plans/shot lists for each photo shoot, and a price list of all your services and products so you don’t have to worry about telling someone an inaccurate prices. Keep examples of prints and some products in your binder too.  You never know when they will come in handy!

4. Be Confident

Staying confident when you are starting out as a young professional is much easier said than done. Sometimes it may seem as though you have been thrown into a shark tank and your just a little fish trying to find their way. I struggled for quite a long time with confidence in regards to my photography. I always feared that when people complimented me they meant that my work was “impressive for someone my age,” instead of accepting that it was just impressive. I never wanted to be talented for a 16 year old or 17 year old and so forth.  I wanted to be talented compared to anyone at any age. Remind yourself that photographers are booked because of their previous work. Clients see your photographs and desire something similar.

It’s easy to doubt yourself when you are shooting for free trying to expand your portfolio, but when someone is paying you, they pay you because they believe in you. If you seem nervous or doubt yourself, your client is going to begin to doubt you too. Smile, hold your head high, and do your best.

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It may be intimidating being the face of a photography business, but no amount of baby face can take away from the quality of work that you produce.

Bio: Mallory Robalino is a 20-year-old photographer from Long Island, NY. She specializes in sport, equestrian, and portrait photography. Some of her work can be seen at her website or her photography Facebook page: Mallory Robalino Photography.

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MCP Photo A Day Challenge: July Themes

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To learn more about MCP Photo A Day.

For July, our themes are inspired by Reality TV Shows.  You can really stretch your imagination with these - take them literally, represent the show, or do a completely unique spin on the words.  Use your creativity – anything goes.  We cannot wait to see how you interpret these! Use your dSLR, iPhone, P&S or even a pinhole.  If it can take a photo, it’s fair game.

It’s never too late to join in.  And if you miss a day or two, or get behind, that’s fine as well.  Just participate when you can.  Here are the fun themes for May. You are welcome to pin this and post it directly to Facebook, Google+ and Instagram too!

How to participate:

 

That’s it – super easy.  We hope you participate.  Make sure to check out MCP on Instagram. We will feature participants’ images – so visit to get inspired and maybe to see your image. 

Comment below and let us know if you will be joining us!

 

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4 Ways To Avoid A Disaster If You Edit In Lightroom

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If you use Lightroom to edit your photos, you may (or may not) realize that your edits are not applied to your image unless you export them out of Lightroom.

Lightroom is essentially a big, huge database of information.  When you edit, whether you use Lightroom presets, make manual adjustments or both, your changes just tell Lightroom what you want to do to the image when it leaves the program. They do NOT actually change the photo.  Since you can see the changes, and even view before and afters, it seems so permanent.

It’s easy to feel like this information in Lightroom is completely safe. And usually it is…   But what if your catalog (which is like a big notebook filled with every set of directions you’ve told Lightroom) dies or gets corrupted?

Here’s three steps you need to take right now to protect your future edits:

1. Back up your Lightroom 5 Catalog.  This backs up your “steps” you’ve told Lightroom you want to do, using presets or manual editing.   Only you can decide how often to back up your catalog based on the value of this information. Remember this does NOT back up the photos themselves. 

Need detailed catalog help?  Learn how to back up your Lightroom catalog HERE.

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2. Consider exporting your images once you are done editing them, even if you are not ready to print or use them in another way.  Remember that adjustments you make in Lightroom are not applied to your photo until exported. Yes, it takes up space on your hard drive but storage is affordable now.

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3. If you are in a storage crunch and really do not have room, here’s another idea.  Change the way the Lightroom catalog works.  Adjust the settings under METADATA.  Go to your Catalog Settings – the location will vary based on your operating system.  It is under the word LIGHTROOM on my Mac.  Then click on the Metadata tab.  And check off “Automatically write changes into XMP.”

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When you do this, the .XMP files will save alongside your Raw files!  This way, if your database corrupts, you still have your edits. It’s as easy as a check box. Boom!

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4. Back up your computer –  None of the above will “save you” if your hard drive crashes.  The most important thing in terms of protection for any photographer, and I cannot stress this enough, is a solid, reliable backup system.  I highly recommend you back up your photos, important files, and any other documents you’d miss if they vanished.  I backup my work in the following ways:

 Don’t let disaster strike your Lightroom catalog or files. Keep everything safe from corruption using these quick, easy steps. Now it’s your turn… What methods do you use to keep your files, catalogs and photos safe?

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